Author Topic: Why Episiotomies(enlarging vagina) are done during delivery??  (Read 1514 times)

metha

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Why Episiotomies(enlarging vagina) are done during delivery??
« on: September 12, 2012, 04:20:13 AM »
I have a doubt that , why Episiotomy (surgical incision of the perineum) is giving to patients during childbirth??This was not happening in old days..now it is providing every patient who is on normal delivery.

lleps

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Re: Why Episiotomies(enlarging vagina) are done during delivery??
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2012, 04:59:25 AM »
Episiotomies are done during the second stage of labor to expand the opening of the vagina to prevent tearing of the area during the delivery of the baby.
That is why episiotomy is given during crowning and now a days its given laterally,, and to prevent further tear perineal support is given...

modila

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Re: Why Episiotomies(enlarging vagina) are done during delivery??
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2012, 08:27:18 AM »
How it can be performed??If the baby is quite large ,will they compress between the walls of the vagina??If they cut down will it damage the anus??Will they give anethesia before they cut?? Is this beneficial??Actually i am really confused about this.I am expecting next month..
« Last Edit: September 18, 2012, 08:33:10 AM by modila »

lleps

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Re: Why Episiotomies(enlarging vagina) are done during delivery??
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2012, 06:15:21 AM »

Episiotomy was though to prevent uncontrolled, jagged tears during delivery by artificially enlarging the external vaginal opening. In some women, the external opening of the vagina will stretch to accommodate the baby's head.
Vaginal opening was anesthetized with a local anesthesia (unless the mother has already had an epidural), and a scissors was used to cut into the space. The cut could be either straight up and down (median episiotomy), or, if the baby was very large or the space very short, the cut was made off to one side (mediolateral episiotomy), to avoid damaging the anal sphincter.
After delivery, the episiotomy is closed in layers with absorbable sutures. There is no need to remove stitches later on because they dissolve and are absorbed..
It is helpful when forceps are used to aid delivery in the second stage. Forceps are relatively large, and to use them properly, an episiotomy is needed.
Shoulder dystocia could also occur when the baby's head is born, but the shoulders become wedged behind the mother's pelvic bone.
The other major reason is to prevent urinary incontinence,as women age,the tissues in the pelvis relax and feel difficulty in holding urine.
Unfortunately, that is not the case, it is the stretching of the ligaments inside the pelvis that probaly lead to weakening and problems with holding in urine.Because of the lack of benefit, and, indeed, an increased risk of tearing, episiotomy should now be used only in specific situations and not for uncomplicated vaginal deliveries.